Why the wars are failures or will be failures anyway Tuesday, Nov 17 2009 

Why the wars are failures or will be failures

Some just refuse to understand this simple logical fact, or just damn evil to enforce it and make you believe that they are right and everybody else is wrong. Don't listen to them!

The biggest problem with the wars and interference is the incompatibility of “our” way with “their” way.

And there is more.

I’m sure of many thinks, that extremism, such as extremist religion and extremist state laws and human rights abuses plays a major role why would most Americans support the idea of “bringing democracy” to these countries.

The biggest problem is, that “our way” is not necessarily compatible and not just that, but “our way” might have become a lot worse, since our economy is the one crumbling, our human right laws are flawed and our jails are full of criminals. This is what they see from over there and of course they don’t want something similar, because they will just point the finger and say “Look, you tell us that it’s horrific to execute people and yet you do the same. You say, our protests were broken up by violent force of the police and yet you do the same (G20 protest). You tell us, that we are extreme, and yet you fill up the jails with people. You tell us that our religion is violent, and yet yours aren’t far, since you are the ones who bomb and imprison innocent people who got nothing to do with world affairs. ”

So what I’m trying to say is…maybe “our way” of life is just as flawed (if not as much) and it is quite hypocritical to try to force such ideology and system to others who got something else.

The Star of David has already became the symbol of oppression, just like the Swastika in Europe

Also about the cultural, ideological, traditional differences. The reason of the violence regarding Israel and the rest is, basically just that. Israel tries (tried) to maintain a system which is based on western ideas and western style living in the middle of a place, where everything else is sharply different. Jordan has a king, Syria is the same, Iran is an Islamic Republic. This is why the Jewish state fails..because it’s too small of a boat in the sea of an entirely different culture, which developed differently but highly compatible to region itself and Israel sticks out as a sore thumb. And this is even a bigger issue, than whether or not Jewish religion differences versus Islam, since many Islamic countries still have quite large Jewish diaspora, even iran has over 60,000 Jews living there since Babylonian times. So it’s not really the question of religion or belief (Both Islam and Jewish are Abrahamic religions anyway so we aren’t talking about sharp differences like Christianity and Buddhism for example) .
The problem is, that after WWII, the Jews who left Europe and formed a state, they brought the European style ideology and used force to gain enough power and land and tried to exist. Unfortunately those Jews who started this, are really not compatible to the region, since they are more Euro

Not all Jews are Zionists

Zionism is Nationalism, but not all Jews are Zionists

pean than Middle-Eastern, save the original population who lived there already.

So anyway, that’s just an example, of how different traditions and governmental-political-ideological systems can be completely incompatible and forcefully trying to change a state or a country will incite bloodshed and hate, no matter what.

Jews in Iran. Jewish religion is NOT alien in the Middle-East

The Middle-East is a hard nutshell to crack..and while we can keep sending thousands upon thousands of troops, it will make a little or no difference. The Afghanistan war or the Iraq war are like a milk drop into a coffee. You try to change the coffee color to milky-coffee but 2-3 drops will just disappear in the whole cup without making any differences. That’s why even if Iraq has a puppet president who support western ideas and even if the Afghan war would be won and a new Honest (not Karzai) president would be sitting there, It might not last long, due to the incredible force of thousands of years of traditions and cultural values and they might just sweep it out within years and everything goes back to what it was or something close to it.

-Well, don’t take that the wrong way, I’m not trying to reference it anyway to skin color or ethnicity, i’m just trying to find a metaphorical example.

So how to change them?

Well, how about by an example of ourselves instead of wars?  How about showing our greatness of leading in technology and social + ideological reforms necessary and not run endlessly in the mouse wheel of stillness?

Peace

Ideas and ways of life that transforms the world and make others change their ways and ideologies towards the better. These are ideas worth spreading

If USA (or EU) want others to change, you aren’t supposed to be using force, because then that becomes the example itself. What we gotta do is to show an example of non-aggression and work on our own problems and work out or own problems and try to leap forward from this staleness and violent behavior.
I can almost guarantee you, that good example without violent interference will definitely make others to follow much quicker than forcing them to swallow a pill, that we wouldn’t even swallow either.

Informacio 2001 Szeptember 11-ikerol Saturday, Oct 24 2009 

Masolok.

In an interview with Christopher Deliso of Antiwar.com, former FBI translator Sibel Edmonds
says that the US government—the State Department in
particular—consistently blocks counterterrorism investigations that
come too close to certain top-level people. “We go for the Attas and
Hamdis—but never touch the guys on the top.… [It] would upset ‘certain
foreign relations.’ But it would also expose certain of our elected
officials, who have significant connections with high-level drugs- and
weapons- smuggling—and thus with the criminal underground, even with
the terrorists themselves.… [A]ll of these high-level criminal
operations involve working with foreign people, foreign countries, the
outside world—and to a certain extent these relations do depend on the
continuation of criminal activities.” Edmonds
says that the government’s investigation into the financing of al-Qaeda
is a case in point. “You know, they are coming down on these charities
as the finance of al-Qaeda.… [But] a very small percentage comes from
these charity foundations. The vast majority of their financing comes
from narcotics. Look, we had 4 to 6 percent of the narcotics coming
from the East, coming from Pakistan, coming from Afghanistan via the
Balkans to the United States. Today, three or four years after Sept.
11, that has reached over 15 percent. How is it getting here? Who are
getting the proceedings from those big narcotics?… But I can tell you
there are a lot of people involved, a lot of ranking officials, and a
lot of illegal activities that include multi-billion-dollar
drug-smuggling operations, black-market nuclear sales to terrorists and
unsavory regimes, you name it. And of course a lot of people from
abroad are involved.” She says that her allegations against co-worker
Melek Can Dickerson and her lawsuit against the FBI are just the tip of
the iceberg. She expresses frustration that the media wants to only
focus on the whistleblower aspect of her case instead of looking into
the substance of her allegations. She says that it was completely by
chance that she stumbled over an ongoing investigation into this
international criminal network. “You can start from the AIPAC angle.
You can start from the [Valerie] Plame case. You can start from my
case. They all end up going to the same place, and they revolve around
the same nucleus of people. There may be a lot of them, but it is one
group. And they are very dangerous for all of us.” [Anti-War (.com), 8/15/2005]

Entity Tags: Sibel Edmonds, US Department of State, Al-Qaeda

Timeline Tags: Complete 911 Timeline

A Háborúk Ára Friday, Oct 23 2009 

http://costofwar.com/

Gyarapodnak a “Sátor városok” Amerikában Wednesday, Oct 21 2009 

Figyelem! Ez a hirek 5/6/2009, szoval meg majusbol valo. Ezerrel fogadok hogy egyetlen magyar ujsag sem irta.  Azota valtozott a helyzet. (meg tobb hontalan es megnagyobb “sator varosok” vannak, csak nehez elkapni a hirekben, mert “nem jo” ezekrol irni, nehogy panikba essen a tobbi okor borju.)

Igen, de nem azert, mert szeretnek kempingezni, es nem is azert, mert a  termeszet utan vagyodtak.

Tent City Occupant

Tent City Occupant

Jim Marshall visszaemlekezik mindenre ami szep volt azon az oszi napon.

A homerseklet kb. olyan 70 fok volt (21 Celsius) November 19-en,  az eg “teljesen kek” es a nevetes kihallatszott parkba a St. petersburgi barbol,  ahol a (39 eves) Marshall ult, es az elso napjat, mint otthontalan, “unnepelte”.

“Ahogy akkor gondolkodtam, mint egy fesztivalon lennek. Most meg azon gondolkodom, hogy hol fogok ma ejszaka aludni ? Hol fogok enni?  Hol fogok zuhanyozni?

A munkanelkuli (Marshall) azok a munkanelkuliek koze esett, akiknek a szama sulyosan megnovekedett (Ed: es tovabb novekedik), az ugynevezett “ekonomiai munkanelkuliek”, egy olyan kifejezes ami azokra vonatkozik, akik ujonnan lettek munkanelkuliek. Vagy elbocsajtas, vagy elveszitettek a hazukat, vagy mas penzugyi problemak altal a recesszio aldozataiva valtak.

Ezek nem ugyanazok a munkanelkuli otthontalanok, akik az utcat lakjak valamilyen mas szemelyes problemak miatt, mint peldaul a drogosok, vagy alkoholistak vagy mentalisan rokkantak.

Nem nem.. az “ekonomiai otthontalanoknak” az amerikai ideal, ami azt hirdteti, hogy tanult es kemeny munka altal, kenyelmes kozep-osztaly szintu eletszinvonal elerhetosege mar csak egy elerhetetlen remeny.  Motelokba, “sator varosokba”, parkolokba tomorulnek, alternativan ketsegbeesve es remennyel munkat probalnak keresni es imadkoznak, hogy megfordul talan a szerencsejuk.

“A szuleim mindig azt tanitottak, hogy kemenyen tanulj az iskolaban, vegezd el a kozepiskolat, menjel egyetemre, szerezz egy diplomat es minden rendben lesz.”  Jobb lesz, mint a szuleidnek, te vagy az “uj generacio” – Meseli Marshall. “Ezt en mindet megcsinaltam. …Egy ideig, jo eletem volt, de mostanara ez mar nem vonatkozik, nem ez a valosag. ”

A sator varosok es a hontalan ovohelyek  California-tol Massachusetts-ig jelentik, hogy novekedesben vannak. A National Alliance to End Homelessness (Nemzetkozi Osszefogas a Hontalansag Felszamolasaert) megjosolta, hogy tobb mint 1.5 millioval fog noni az otthontalanok szama.  Mar most “tobb szazezer” veszitette el az otthonat, mondja az egyesulet elnoke Nan Roman.

(tobbet nem forditok, azt hiszem ennyi eleg most)

In English:

PINELLAS COUNTY, Fla. — Jim Marshall recalls everything about that beautiful fall day.

The temperature was about 70 degrees on Nov. 19, the sky was “totally blue,” and the laughter from a martini bar drifted into the St. Petersburg park where Marshall, 39, sat contemplating his first day of homelessness.

I was thinking, ‘That was me at one point,’ ” he says of the revelers. “Now I’m thinking, ‘Where am I going to sleep tonight? Where do I eat? Where do I shower?’ ”

The unemployed Detroit autoworker moved to Florida last year hoping he’d have better luck finding a job. He didn’t, and he spent three months sleeping on sidewalks before landing in a tent city in Pinellas County, north of St. Petersburg, on Feb. 26.

Marshall is among a growing number of the economic homeless, a term for those newly displaced by layoffs, foreclosures or other financial troubles caused by the recession. They differ from the chronic homeless, the longtime street residents who often suffer from mental illness, drug abuse or alcoholism.

For the economic homeless, the American ideal that education and hard work lead to a comfortable middle-class life has slipped out of reach. They’re packing into motels, parking lots and tent cities, alternately distressed and hopeful, searching for work and praying their fortunes will change.

“My parents always taught me to work hard in school, graduate high school, go to college, get a degree and you’ll do fine. You’ll do better than your parents’ generation,” Marshall says. “I did all those things. … For a while, I did have that good life, but nowadays that’s not the reality.”

Tent cities and shelters from California to Massachusetts report growing demand from the newly homeless. The National Alliance to End Homelessness predicted in January that the recession would force 1.5 million more people into homelessness over the next two years. Already, “tens of thousands” have lost their homes, Alliance President Nan Roman says.

The $1.5 billion in new federal stimulus funds for homelessness prevention will help people pay rent, utility bills, moving costs or security deposits, she says, but it won’t be enough.

“We’re hearing from shelter providers that the shelters are overflowing, filled to capacity,” says Ellen Bassuk, president of the National Center on Family Homelessness. “The number of families on the streets has dramatically increased.”

‘A change in the population’

Pinellas Hope, the tent city run by Catholic Charities here since December 2007, has been largely for the chronically homeless, some of whom suffer from mental illness or struggle with drugs or alcohol.

About 20% of its 240 residents became homeless recently because of the economic downturn, says Frank Murphy, president of Catholic Charities, Diocese of St. Petersburg.

“We’re seeing a change in the population. … We’re seeing a lot more that are just plain losing their jobs and their homes,” says Sheila Lopez, chief operating officer of the charity. “A lot are either job-ready or working but have lost their home because they were laid off, or their apartment, and now can’t go to work because they’re not shaven, they’re not clean, they’re living in a car, or they’re living on the street.”

The charity plans to expand the tent city and build an encampment in a neighboring county, an idea that has drawn objections from nearby homeowners and businesses.

Communities elsewhere are facing similar pressures:

• In Massachusetts, a record number of homeless families need emergency shelter, says Robyn Frost, executive director of the Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless. In mid-April, there were 2,763 families in shelters, including 655 in motels because the shelters were full, an increase of 36% since July, she says.

“We have a high number of foreclosure properties, and many of them are multifamily apartments,” Frost says. “We were seeing a great number of families being displaced.”

• Reno officials shut down a tent city in October after making more shelter space available, but new encampments are popping up along the Truckee River and elsewhere, says Kelly Marschall of the Reno Area Alliance for the Homeless.

The homeless include “a startling number of first-time homeless,” she says. “We asked them what industries they were involved in. The majority were talking about construction, the housing industry, real estate. There was a direct correlation to the housing market crash.”

• In Santa Barbara, Calif., 84 men and women sleep in their cars, trucks or recreational vehicles in 17 parking lots around the city, says Jason Johnson with the New Beginnings Counseling Center, which runs the RV Safe Parking Program. The city, which allows the use of three municipal lots at night, supports the program, says city parking superintendent Victor Garza. Last May, there were 58 participants and no waiting list. Now 40 people are waiting.

“People’s last refuge has become their vehicle,” Johnson says.

Objections by residents

Pinellas Hope in Florida looks like a cookie-cutter subdivision, except that the orderly rows are of tents, not houses. Besides 250 tents, all of similar size, shape and color, there are 15 wooden sheds, 6 feet by 8 feet, that Catholic Charities built as shelters.

The charity plans to reduce the number of tents to 150 and erect 100 sheds, which are more durable, and build as many as 80 permanent studio apartments on the property, Murphy says.

His group also wants to open a campground for 240 homeless people in neighboring Hillsborough County, he says, primarily using wooden sheds.

Unlike Pinellas Hope, which doesn’t border residential neighborhoods, the Hillsborough County parcel is across the street from a tidy 325-home subdivision called East Lake Park. There, opponents of the tent city have a website: http://www.stoptentcity.com.

Hal and Cindy Hart are raising three grandchildren in their home on the lake. The kids, 4 to 13, fish for bass, ride their bikes to friends’ houses and attend neighborhood parties.

The Harts fear that large numbers of homeless people, some with addictions and criminal backgrounds, would loiter in the neighborhood. “We will not be able to let our grandchildren ride their bikes outside without constant supervision,” says Hal Hart, 52, a paralegal.

The Harts agree that the homeless population needs services, but they think the emphasis should be on programs that will help families, not single adults.

Murphy says the diocese wants to address the neighbors’ concerns and has lowered the number of proposed occupants from 500.

‘A temporary situation’

Pinellas Hope, which has a waiting list of about 150 people, is attracting a growing stream of homeless men, women and couples. Families with children are sent to area shelters.

New arrivals must agree to rules, such as not using drugs or alcohol, and perform chores, Lopez says. They get mats, sleeping bags, toiletries, flip-flops for showers and lockable boxes in their tents to store valuables. Within one week, they must make a plan describing how they will work their way out of homelessness.

Residents are expected to move on within five months, but some stay longer. Campers have access to trailers with bathrooms, showers, computers, washers and dryers and a room of donated clothes. They get a free bus pass the first month and advice on writing résumés.

By day, some leave camp to look for work or ride the bus to pass the time. Others stay, watching TV in large communal tents, doing laundry or playing Monopoly. At night, an off-duty police officer patrols the camp, which is governed by curfews: 10:30 p.m. on weeknights and midnight Fridays and Saturdays.

The camp bustles at dinnertime, when everyone gathers for a hot meal provided by churches and other organizations.

A year ago, there were 5,500 homeless people in Pinellas County, says St. Petersburg police officer Richard Linkiewicz, a homeless-outreach officer. This year, there are 7,500, including 1,300 children in homeless families, he says.

Many of the newly homeless worked in construction, a booming industry in Florida before the economic bust, he says.

David Grondin, 48, moved in on Feb. 7 and stayed for two months. A union carpenter, he graduated from the University of South Florida in 1999 with a bachelor’s degree in fine arts.

He struggled as carpentry work and odd jobs disappeared. When his 1992 Saturn died in August, he could no longer get to jobs far from public transportation routes.

Frustrated by his inability to find a job in Florida, last month Grondin took a bus to Portland, Maine, where he’s staying with friends and looking for carpentry work. “I was definitely middle class,” he says. “I had a car. I got a paycheck every week.”

Kevin Shutt, 53, moved into Pinellas Hope in March after he was laid off from his job waiting tables because diners “stopped coming through the doors,” he says.

Shutt has decorated his tent with house plants, including a ficus tree his mother gave him nearly 30 years ago, and pinned Tampa Bay Rays and Buccaneers jerseys to the inside walls.

He tearfully recounts how he got kicked out of his apartment by a roommate when he couldn’t come up with the rent. A former homeowner who made Caesar salads tableside at restaurants, now he can’t get a job at Taco Bell, he says. “This is the first time in my life I ever dreamed about living in a tent,” he says.

An optimist by nature, Shutt vows that his stay will be short. He has filled out more than 175 job applications and occasionally works for a friend doing canvas work on boats. “This is a temporary situation,” he says.

A diminished outlook

Marshall, the former autoworker, has an associate’s degree in electronic engineering and is less encouraged.

He remembers a comfortable life in Michigan, where he worked in automotive testing, owned a brick ranch-style home, made up to $50,000 a year and played in softball leagues.

Companies he worked for started losing contracts a few years ago, and eventually the work dried up, he says. He sold his house and moved into an apartment, but by 2007 he couldn’t pay the rent.

He came to Florida in August, thinking the job market was better. But he couldn’t pay the rent here, either.

At Pinellas Hope, Marshall searches online job sites or takes the bus to apply for work at McDonald’s, factories and Wal-Mart. He gets $45 a week selling his blood plasma.

“I have my résumé online. I go door to door. I make phone calls,” he says. “I have not received one phone call, one e-mail. I thought with my experience and my degree, it wouldn’t be this difficult.”

Marshall feels ill at ease in the camp and has trouble sleeping, and not just because of the armadillos that burrow under his tent. “I’m scared,” he says. “If I can’t find a job, where do I go next?”

At this point, he has lowered his expectations. “I don’t expect ever to make $50,000 a year working in the auto industry, but just enough to survive, have my own place, buy my own food, my own clothes,” he says. “What every American would expect.”

Innen: